Venue

Instituto de Investigaciones Biológicas Clemente Estable
Avenida Italia 3318
Montevideo, Uruguay

 

Transportation to the Satellite Venue

The Instituto de Investigaciones Biológicas Clemente Estable is at Avenida Italia 3318 between Francisco Simón and Magariños Cervantes.

Transport to the institute from downtown:

- Bus: buses number 64 and 21 go along 18 de Julio and leave you at the doorstep of the Instituto (Check the map with the bus route). The ticket is 28 uruguayan pesos. From the Radisson Hotel it is a 30 min ride

- Taxis: They can take up to four passengers. You can simply ask the receptionist at the hotel to call one. If you take them on the street, they are white and yellow or black and yellow (available ones have a "Libre" sign lit up in red). A taxi from the Radisson Hotel to the Institute will charge you an approximate fare of 200 uruguayan pesos.

 

Poster Size and Poster Sessions

All posters will remain for both sessions. Poster dimensions are the same as for the ICN:
a wide poster board space (150cm wide × 120 cm height) will be avaliable for each poster.
U-tac and adhesive tape will be provided.



Program

Sunday March 27th

19.30. Welcome Cocktail and Registration

20.00 Session: Historical Round Table
Pioneers of the field share memories and highlights of research in Electric Fish

Invited speakers
Peter Moller (USA)
Curtis Bell (USA)
Kirsty Grant (France)
Omar Macadar (Uruguay)
Omar Trujillo-Cenóz (Uruguay)

 

Monday March 28th

Session: Electromotor Mechanisms

9:00

An electric fish potassium channel specialized for ultra-brief discharges.
Harold Zakon (University of Texas at Austin, USA)

9:20

Timing precision and stability of a neuronal pacemaker.
John Lewis (University of Ottawa, Canada)

9:40

Cellular determinants of the repertoire of electromotor behaviors in Gymnotus omarorum. Analysis of the innervation pattern and intranuclear connectivity of the medullary pacemaker nucleus. Virginia Comas (Universidad de la República, Uruguay)

10.00 Coffee Break

Session: Conspecific Signal Detection and Avoidance

10:20

Electric organ discharge modulations in the pulse-type electric fish Microsternarchus (Gymnotiformes) exposed to a jamming stimulus.
José Alves-Gomes (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Brazil)

10:40

Co-adaptation of electric organ discharges and chirps in South American ghost knifefishes (Apteronotidae).
Troy Smith (Indiana University, USA)

11:00

Behavioral responses to jamming stimuli in pulse-discharging Gymnotiforms: phylogenetic signal and behavioral context. Cristopher Braun (Hunter College, USA)

11.20       Coffee Break

Session: Social Behavior and Communication

11:40

Building a case for the study of neuroendocrine control of social behavior: the non-breeding territorial aggression of Gymnotus omarorum.
Ana Silva (Instituto de Investigaciones Biológicas Clemente Estable/ Universidad de la República, Uruguay)

12:00

Court and spark in the wild:communication at the limits of sensation.
Jörg Henninger (Eberhard Karls Universität, Germany)

12:20

Inhibition of the post-synaptic 5-HT1A receptor regulates aggressive behaviors and cortisol levels in the gymnotiform fish Brachyhypopomus gauderio.
Vielka Salazar (Cape Breton University, Canada)

12:40      Lunch Break

Session: Electric Imaging and Behavior

14:30

Artificial electric sense for underwater robotics.
Frédéric Boyer (Institut de Recherche en Communication et Cybernétique de Nantes, France)

14:50

Electrosensory parallax: electric field geometry gives rise to a dynamic cue of relative depth.
Federico Pedraja (Bielefeld University, Germany)

15:10

Distance estimation based on the dynamics of self generated electrosensory flow.
Jacob Engelmann (Bielefeld University, Germany)

15:30

Multisensing and cross-modal object recognition in a fish. Sarah Schumacher (Universität Bonn, Germany)

15.50       Coffee Break

Session: Peripheral Neural Coding

16:10

Optimal sensory coding: lessons from the active electroreceptor afferents of weakly electric fish.
Rama Ratnam (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA/ Advanced Digital Sciences Center, Illinois at Singapore, Singapore)

16:30

Transient synchrony across oscillating receptors results in time-locked evoked potentials in the central electrosensory system of weakly electric fish.
Alejandro Vélez (Washington University in St. Louis, USA)

16:50

Synchronous spikes are necessary but not sufficient for a synchrony code.
Jan Grewe (Eberhard Karls University Tübingen/ Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience, Germany)

17:30 – 20:00  Poster Session, wine & cheese tasting.

Art installation in courtyard: Joseph Bigley (Art and Art History, Spelman College, USA) in collaboration with Michael McGinnis (Biology, Spelman College, USA)


Tuesday March 29th

Session: Sensory Processing at the ELL

9:00

Neural coding of electric image in Gymnotus omarorum.
Alejo Rodríguez (Instituto de Investigaciones Biológicas Clemente Estable, Uruguay)

9:20

Modeling latency code processing in the electric sense.
Leonel Gómez-Sena (Universidad de la República, Uruguay)

9:40

Neuronal correlations in the ell pyramidal cell population encode second order stimulus attributes.
Volker Hofmann (McGill University, Canada)

10:00

Sensory predictions in electrosensory systems: behavioral significance and relevance to mammalian brain function.
Nathaniel Sawtell (Columbia University, USA)

10.20 Coffee Break

Session: Sensory Processing at Higher Centers

10:40

SK channels underlie efficient parallel processing and perception of natural sensory stimuli.
Chengjie Huang (McGill University, Canada)

11:00

Neural correlations enable invariant coding and perception of natural stimuli.
Michael Metzen (McGill University, Canada)

11:20

Representation of electrolocation related stimuli in the thalamus analog of weakly electric fish.
Avner Wallach (University of Ottawa, Canada)

11.40  Coffee Break

Session: Neural Coding and Communication

12:00

Sensory-evoked serotonin dynamics and its relation to ongoing communication behavior.
Haleh Fotowat(University of Ottawa, Canada)

12:20

Dynamics of the electro-motor-sensory loop in pulse Gymnotiformes.
Pedro Aguilera (Instituto de Investigaciones Biológicas Clemente Estable, Uruguay)

12:40

Sensory adaptation to the social environment through spike-timing-dependent plasticity in mormyrid electric fish.
Bruce Carlson (Washington University in St. Louis, USA)

13:00  Lunch Break

Session: Cell Proliferation and Plasticity

14:30

Predators inhibit brain cell proliferation in natural populations of electric fish, Brachyhypopomus occidentalis.
Kent Dunlap (Trinity College, USA)

14:50

Postnatal neurogenesis in the pulse type weakly electric mormyrid Mormyrus rume.
María Castelló (Instituto de Investigaciones Biológicas Clemente Estable, Uruguay)

15:10

Electrical activity-dependent regulation of muscle gene expression in the electric organ after chronic stimulation in live Sternopygus macrurus.
Graciela Unguez (New Mexico State University, USA)

15.30  Coffee Break

Session: Genes and Evolution

15:50

Genetic drift and natural selection as driving forces in the evolution of electric signals in weakly electric fish.
Rüdiger Krahe  (McGill University, Canada)

16:10

The mormyrid genome: projects, prospects and new tools for neuroethology.
Jason Gallant (Michigan State University, USA)

16:30

Criptic diversity in Hypopygus neblinae: evidences from the EOD variation and DNA barcode sequences.
Renata Schmitt (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Brazil)

16:50

Intragenus (Campylomormyrus) and intergenus hybrids in mormyrid fish: physiological and histological investigations of the electric organ ontogeny.
Frank Kirschbaum (Humboldt University, Germany)

17:30 – 19:00   Poster Session

19.30 - …. Farewell Dinner

 

Poster presentations:

  •  

DYNAMIC NEURAL TUNING AND PERCEPTION ENABLES RAPID ADAPTATION TO NATURAL SENSORY STIMULI UNDER DIFFERENT BEHAVIOURALLY-RELEVANT CONTEXTS
C. G. Huang, D. Martinez, M. G. Metzen &  M. J. Chacron

  •  

POSSIBLE ORIGIN OF THE VARIABILITY OF THE RHYTHMIC DISCHARGE OF THE ELECTROMOTOR SYSTEM IN A PULSE TYPE GYMNOTIFORM FISH.
M. Vitar, V. Comas & M. Borde

  •  

SPATIAL LEARNING IN WEAKLY ELECTRIC FISH (GNATHONEMUS PETERSII) 
P. A. Serrano, S. H. Braren, V. Sebastian, D. Jaubelli, C. B. Braun & P. Moller

  •  

GENERATION AND SUBTRACTION OF PREDICTIONS IMPROVES NEURAL CODING AND PERCEPTION IN AN ELECTRIC FISH
A. Enikolopov, L. Abbott  & N. B. Sawtell

  •  

PULSE DISCRIMINATION FROM TWO FREELY SWIMMING GYMNOTUS SP.
R.T. Guariento, P. Matias, J.F.W. Slaets, L.O.B. Almeida &  R.D. Pinto

  •  

THE TRANSCRIPTIONAL BASIS OF DIVERGENT ELECTRIC ORGAN DISCHARGES IN PARAMORMYROPS ELECTRIC FISH.
M. Losilla &  J. R. Gallant

  •  

THE MALE INTRASEXUAL AGGRESSION OF THE WEAKLY ELECTRIC FISH, Gymnotus omarorum, AS MODEL SYSTEM FOR THE STUDY OF NON-BREEDING TERRITORIAL AGGRESSION.
C. Jalabert, L. Quintana &  A. Silva

  •  

TRANSCRIPTOMES OF THE PACEMAKER NUCLEUS OF MALE AND FEMALE
APTERONOTUS LEPTORHYNCHUS AND APTERONOTUS ALBIFRONS
G. T. Smith, A. Smith, M. Proffitt, &  D. Rusch

  •  

WEAK SIGNAL AMPLIFICATION AND DETECTION BY HIGHER-ORDER SENSORY NEURONS
S.N. Jung, A. Longtin &  L. Maler

  •  

ELECTRIC SIGNALS CHANGE MEANING UNDER DIFFERENT FOOD
P. K. Stoddard, S Gavassa

  •  

A SOMATOTOPIC MAP OF THE ACTIVE ELECTROSENSORY SENSE IN THE MIDBRAIN OF THE GNATHONEMUS PETERSII.
V. Hollmann, V. Hofmann &  J. Engelmann

  •  

LEARNING AND RECALL OF A SPATIAL MEMORY TASK IN A WEAKLY ELECTRIC FISH (GNATHONEMUS PETERSII)
S.N. Jung, S. Künzel &  J. Engelmann

  •  

MICROHABITAT DISTRIBUTION OF WEAKLY ELECTRIC FISH POPULATIONS IN
NEOTROPICAL HABITATS
J. Sehuanes, T. Raab, J. Henninger, J. Molina, H. Fotowat,R. Krahe &  J. Benda

  •  

AUTOMATIZED SEPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF INDIVIDUAL FISH FROM
OUTDOOR EOD RECORDINGS
T. Raab, J. Sehuanes, F. Sinz, J. Henninger & J. Benda

  •  

OBJECT DETECTION IN ELECTROSENSORY LEARNING: THE ACTION-PERCEPTION
LOOP IN GNATHONEMUS PETERSII.
F. Pedraja, V. Hofmann, D. Klocke, and J. Engelmann

  •  

ANDROGENIC MODULATION OF CHIRP-LIKE SIGNALS IN THE PULSE-TYPE GYMNOTIFORM:  STEATOGENYS ELEGANS.
C. B. Braun & C.Field

  •  

THE ROLE OF ESTRADIOL UNDERLYING NON-BREEDING TERRITORIAL AGGRESSION IN A TELEOST FISH: A COMPLEMENTARY APPROACH FROM THE FIELD AND THE LAB
L Zubizarreta, L Quintana, R G Moreira, R M Honji & A Silva

  •  

FREE RUNNING IN THE WILD: CIRCADIAN RHYTHMICITY IN ELECTRIC BEHAVIOR IN TWO SPECIES OF SOUTH AMERICAN WEAKLY ELECTRIC
Migliaro, A & Silva, A

  •  

SOCIAL EFFECT OF VASOTOCIN ON THE AGONISTIC ELECTRIC DISPLAYS
OF TWO SPECIES OF WEAKLY ELECTRIC FISH.
R. Perrone & A. Silva

  •  

A VERSATILE MICROPROCESSOR BASED RECORDING PLATFORM FOR FIELD OR LABORATORY RECORDING OF ELECTRIC FISH.
M. McGinnis

  •  

CONDITION-DEPENDENT SIGNALING IN A SPECIES RICH ASSEMBLAGE OF
BRACHYHYPOPOMUS FROM THE UPPER AMAZON.
J.C. Waddell &  W.G.R. Crampton

  •  

ELECTRIC PILLOW TALK: ELECTROCOMMUNICATION IN SPAWNING ELECTRIC FISH
J. Henninger, F. Kirschbaum, R. Krahe & Jan Benda

  •  

SPECIALIZATION OF NEURAL CODING FOR COMMUNICATION IN APTERONOTUS ALBIFRONS.
K.M. Allen & G. Marsat

  •  

Electroreceptive fields in Gymnotus omarorum.
Carolina Pereira, Alejo Rodríguez-Cattaneo, Pedro Aguilera &  A. Caputi

  •  

NEURONAL TUNING OF THE GYMNOTIFORM ELECTROSENSORY LATERAL LINE LOBE TO NATURAL COMMUNICATION SIGNALS
V. Hofmann, M.G. Metzen & M.J. Chacron



Organizing Committee:

Angel Caputi (coordinator, IIBCE, Uruguay),
María Castelló (IIBCE, Uruguay),
Len Maler (University of Ottawa, Canada),
Laura Quintana (IIBCE, Uruguay),
Gerhard von der Emde (University of Bonn, Germany)

Please send any questions or comments you may have to efish.montevideo@gmail.com

We look forward to welcoming you to Uruguay!

Registration fee: USD 125

 


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